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Sight Seeing

Delhi offers a multitude of interesting places and attractions to the visitor, so much so that it becomes difficult to decide from where to begin exploring the city. In Old Delhi, attractions like mosques, forts, and other monuments that depict India's Muslim history. The important places in Old Delhi includes the majestic Red Fort, the historical Chandni Chowk, besides Raj Ghat and Shanti Vana, the last two being modern structures constructed after India's Independence in 1947.

New Delhi, on the other hand, is a modern city designed by Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker. Delhi is a spacious, open city that houses many government buildings and embassies, apart from places of historical interest.

Notable attractions in New Delhi include the Rashtrapati Bhawan, the one-time imperial residence of the British viceroys; the India Gate, a memorial raised in honour of the Indian soldiers martyred during the Afghan war; the Laxminarayan Temple, built by the Birlas, one of India's leading industrial families; the Humayun's Tomb, said to be the forerunner of the Taj at Agra; the Purana Quila, built by Humayun, with later-day modifications by Sher Shah Suri; Tughlaqabad, Delhi's most colossal and awesome fort; Qutab Minar, built by Qutub-ud- din Aibek of the Slave Dynasty; and the lotus-shaped Baha'i Temple.

 

 

Alai Minar

Alai Minar

The same time as Ala-ud-din made his additions to the mosque, he also conceived a far more ambitious construction programme. He would build a second tower of victory, exactly like the Qutab Minar, except it would be twice as high! When he died the tower had reached 27 metres and no-one was willing to continue his over-ambitious project. The uncompleted tower stands to the north of the Qutab Minar and the mosque.

 

 

 

Azad Hind Gram Tourist Complex

At Tikri Kalan is a project developed by Delhi Tourism to honour Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose and to create quality leisure space and wayside amenities for the citizens. Located within two km of the Delhi Haryana border on NH-10, elaborate mosaic domes surround a museum and a memorial and are the focus of the complex which offers the facilities of extensive plazas, an amphitheatre, tourist information centre, souvenir and garden shop, food kiosks, a restaurant and convention facilities.

 

 

Bahai Temple

Lying to the East of the Siri is this Lotus shaped building. Built in 1980 and 1986, it is set amongst pools and gardens and adherents of any faith are free to visit the temple and pray or meditate silently according to their own religion.

 

 

Birla Mandir

Birla Mandir

Birla Mandir was built by G. D. Birla in 1938 and is located in the west of Connaught Place. The temple is dedicated to the goddess of prosperity and good fortune and has well crafted gardens. It is also known as the Lakshmi Narayan Temple.

 

 

 

 

 

Chanakyapuri (Diplomatic Enclave)

This area southwest of New Delhi is where you'll find the foreign embassies. Many are true showplaces, so take time to drive past and admire the architecture and the grounds. Most can be seen from the street. Head down Kautilya Marg and Shanti Path, past the British High Commission and U.S. Embassy, for notable examples. Nearby is the elegant Santushti Shopping Centre.

 

 

Chandni Chowk 

Chandni Chowk 

The main street of Old Delhi is the colourful shopping bazaar known as Chandni Chowk. At the East end of the Chandni Chowk and North of the Jama Masjid, there is a Jain Temple with a small marble courtyard surrounded by a colonnade. 

The West end of Chandni Chowk is marked by the Fatehpuri Mosque which was erected in 1650 by one of Shah Jahan's wives.

It is the nerve centre of old Delhi, and is really a huge marketplace. Open since 1654, it begins in front of Red Fort and is one of the largest wholesale centres in Asia. Clusters of shops sell everything from electronic products, watches and clocks to traditional Indian goods and tourist trinkets. 

Be warned that an afternoon in Chandni Chowk is not for the faint of heart. Come prepared to be jostled around by all manner of shoppers, shopkeepers, panhandlers, rickshaw-riders and the rest of the teeming mass of bodies that crowd the area's lanes and stores. 

Still, it is a vibrant part of Delhi where you can look up and sense, if only for a moment, how life must have been in Mughal times. The homes open into the narrow alleys, and you can spot old courtyards, stone doorways and filigreed windows. This is Delhi at its most chaotic - an assault on all your senses. Plan at least half a day to stroll through this perennially packed area.

 

 

 

Chattarpur Mandir

Chattarpur Mandir

This entire complex of temples is called Chattarpur Mandir and is located beyond the Qutab Minar in Mehrauli. Dedicated to Goddess Durga, built in South Indian style the temple complex is spread over a large area with beautiful lawns and gardens. Though devotees visit these temples through the year, during the navratras, devotees come from near and far.

 

 

Connaught Place  

Connaught Place

Located at the northern end of New Delhi and built by the British in 1931, this giant roundabout is the business and tourist hub of New Delhi. Three concentric circles and eight radial roads make up this lively neighbourhood where well-to-do residents and visitors go to shop, eat and do business. 

Stores fill the streets radiating from Connaught Place where each Indian state has a shop offering its handicrafts. There is also a claustrophobic underground market near Connaught (its main attraction is the air-conditioning).

 

 

Coronation Durbar  

This is a must do for incurable Raj fans looking for their fix of nostalgia. It is north of Old Delhi and is best reached by auto-rickshaw. An obelisk marks the site where the durbars were enacted between 1877 and 1903. It was here that King George V was declared Emperor of India in 1911.

 

 

Dilli Haat  

Dilli Haat

For handicrafts, ethnic food and entertainment is situated in the heart of Delhi is an upgraded version of the traditional weekly market, offering a delightful amalgam of craft, food and cultural activities. However, while the village haat is a mobile, flexible arrangement at Dilli Haat, a permanent haat, it is the craftsmen who are mobile and ever-changing thereby offering a kaleidoscope of the richness and diversity of Indian handicrafts and artefacts.

 

 

Diwan - I – am  

Diwan - I – am

The Hall of Public Audiences was where the emperor would sit to hear complaints or disputes from his subjects. His alcove in the wall was marble- panelled and set with precious stones, many of which were looted following the Mutiny. This elegant hall was restored by Lord Curzon, the Viceroy of India between 1898 and 1905.

 

 

 

Diwan - I – Khas

Diwan - I – Khas

Is the Hall of Private Audiences, built in white marble and was the luxurious chamber where the Emperor would hold private meetings. Centrepiece of the hall was the Peacock Throne. In 1760, the Marathas also removed the silver ceiling from the hall, so today it is a pale shadow of its former glory.

 

 

 

 

Feroz Shah Kotla

The ruins of Ferozabad, the fifth city of Delhi, erected by Feroz Shah Tughlaq in 1354 can be found at Feroz Shah Kotla, just off Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg between the Old and New Delhi. A 13-metre-high sandstone obelisk with Ashoka's edicts (and a later inscription) can be seen in the old fortress palace.

Also to be seen are the remains of an old mosque and a fine well. But most of the ruins were used in the construction of later cities.

HAUZ KHAS POND was probably built by Alauddin Khilji in AD 1295. Delhi Tourism holds various entertainment programs here and Alauddin’s tank now serves as an excellent backdrop to cultural events.

 

 

Hauz Khas Village

This historic village in south Delhi has been encompassed by urban Delhi. It is now considered a green suburb, with an eclectic collection of boutiques, restaurants and art studios. Village tea stalls, stray dogs and the most expensive designer couture all coexist in the same surreal space. It can be found next to the Green Park, Delhi.

 

 

Humayun's Tomb

Humayun's Tomb

Built in the mid 16th century by Haji Begum, senior wife of Humayun, this is an early example of Mughal architecture. The elements in its design, a squat building, lighted by high arched entrances, topped by a bulbous dome and surrounded by formal gardens, were to be refined over the years to the magnificence of the Taj Mahal.

 

 

 

India Gate

India Gate

This 42 metre high stone arch of triumph stands at the eastern end of the Rajpath. It bears the name of 85,000 Indian Army soldiers who died in the campaigns of WW I , the North - West Frontier operations of the same and the 1919 Afghan fiasco.

 

 

 

 

Indraprashtha

According to the Mahabharata, Indraprashtha was the most flourishing city, capital of the Pandavas, with gigantic forts and magnificent palaces. 

Excavations at the Purana Quila, identified as the site of Indraprashtha, has yielded proof of the site having remained under continuous occupation up to 1000 BC.

The Mauryas, Sungas, Kushans, Guptas, Rajputs, and Mughals held it under their sway, however no evidence has yet been unearthed. With the decline of Buddhism, Delhi fell into oblivion and for centuries remained an inconsequential adjunct of great contemporary cities like Mathura and Kannauj.

 

 

 

Iskcon Temple

Iskcon Temple

Completed in 1998, this is a complex of temples. Built on a hilly place the temple is dedicated to the Lord Krishna and was built by the Hare-Rama Hare-Krishna cult followers. The complex is elegantly built and is one of the largest temple complexes in India.

 

 

 

 

Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

The great mosque of Old Delhi is both the largest in India and the final architectural extravagance of Shah Jahan. It has three great gateways constructed of alternating vertical strips of red sandstone and white marble. 

The courtyard of the mosque has a capacity of 25,000 people. The main mosque is crowned by three onion shaped domes made of white marble and inlaid with stripes of black slate.

On the north and south of the complex are two 130 feet high minarets, which offer a spectacular bird's eye-view of the city. Jama Masjid is not only architecturally beautiful, but also a place of great religious significance as it houses a hair from the beard of the Prophet and also a chapter of the Holy Quran written by him. 

The Jama Masjid‘s gorgeously cusped arches span a facade that’s topped by beautifully proportioned domes, each tapering elegantly upwards.

 

 

 

Jantar Mantar  

Jantar Mantar

Is an astronomical observatory with masonry instruments, built in 1724 by Jai Singh, the mathematician and astronomer king. The Samrat or Yantra supreme, the largest structure shaped like a right-angled triangle, is actually a huge sun-dial; the other five instruments are intended to show the movements of the sun, moon, etc.

 

 

 

 

Janpath

Janpath

Is one of the busiest roads in New Delhi. Tourism Dept Office of Govt of India is located at 88 Janpath. You may seek their assistance Monday to Friday from 9-00 to 18-00 and on Saturday from 9-00 to 13-00. Sunday closed. 

Janpath meets Rajpath going further south. To the east of Rajpath is India Gate and to the west are Parliament House and Rashtrapati Bhawan.

Further south there is the posh area of New Delhi, the Defence Colony, Lodhi Colony, Greater Kailash, and Basanta Bihar etc.

 

 

 

Khirki Masjid

Khirki Masjid

Is located in Khirki village in South Delhi and was built by Khan-i-Jahan Junan Shah, the prime minister of Ferozshah, in the early 15th century. This building is a link between Lodi style of architecture and the ornate Mughal architecture that was to follow.

 

 

 

 

Lal Kot

Lal Kot

A mosque built by Qutub-ud-din Aibak the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, marks the foundation of the Qutub Minar. The first city of Delhi, was built around 1060 AD by the Hindu Tomar King Anangpal. 

This was enlarged by Prithviraj Chauhan, the celebrated Rajput. Later, the first Muslim ruler of Delhi, Qutab-ud-din-Aibak, built Quwatul-Islam mosque and laid the foundation of the Qutab Minar.

 

 

 

Lodhi Gardens 

Alai Minar

In these well-kept gardens are the tombs of Sayyid and Lodhi rulers.

The Lodi Gardens is in its best position during the months of February and March, when the winter season flowers are in full bloom. The Lodi Gardens has a Rose Garden, a Green House where plants are stored and numerous species of trees.

Throughout the year many species of birds are seen in the gardens. Along with many birds, even vultures could be seen at times. The Lodi Gardens is also a popular picnic destination in the winter months and it gets over crowded every afternoon. Even Yoga classes are held in the gardens. The heart of ultra-modern South Delhi has preserved a gorgeous exemplar of history like the Lodi Gardens.

 

 

 

Lodi Tombs

Alai Minar

Evidence of the sixth city, said to have been built by the Sayyid and Lodi dynasties is found only in the tombs and mosques in the famous Lodi Gardens, which is a favourite point for early morning walkers from the posh south Delhi colonies.

 

 

 

 

Mandi House 

Is the nerve centre of cultural activity in Delhi. Close to Connaught Place, the complex has a number of auditoria and cultural institutions where regular performances take place. The other main cultural centre is the Siri Fort auditorium near the Asian Games Village.

 

 

 

Masjid Moth

Masjid Moth

Located between Uday Park and South Extension in South Delhi, Masjid Moth was built by Wazir Miyan Bhoiya, the minister of Sikandar Lodi, in the 16th century.

 

 

 

 

Moti Masjid

Moti Masjid

Built in 1659 by Aurangzeb for his own personal use, the small and totally enclosed Pearl Mosque, made of marble.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nizamuddin

Across the road from Humayun's Tomb is the shrine of the Sufi Saint Nizamud- din Chisti. His shrine, with its large tank, is one of several interesting tombs here. It is worth visiting the shrine at around sunset on Thursdays, as it is a popular time for worship and qawwali singers start performing after the evening prayers.

 

 

 

Old Delhi

Old Delhi

Old Delhi was built by the fifth Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, builder of the Taj Mahal. Within this area of enclosed streets, mosques, tombs and bazaars, are the Red Fort and the famous mosque, Jama Masjid. The succession of buildings, palaces, pavilions and halls of public and private audience within, are silent witnesses of a by gone grandeur.

 

 

 

Paliament House (Sansad Bhawan)

Paliament House (Sansad Bhawan)

One of the most graceful monuments of this metropolis is the Parliament House, situated on the left of the Rashtrapati Bhawan. This circular edifice measures 1.6 km in circumference. Inside are three huge halls where the upper and lower houses of Parliament meet. 

Permits to visit the parliament and sit in the public gallery are available from the reception office on Raisina Road but you will need a letter from your embassy.

 

 

 

Pragati Maidan

Pragati Maidan

Founded in 1982 on the eve of Asian Games. Various Trade Fairs are organised here throughout the year. There are different museums set up here such as the Energy is Life, Craft Museum with the collections of weaving and metal products. It is open from 10-00 to 17-00 and on holidays it remains open till 20-00. Give it a call on 3318681 for more information.

 

 

 

Purana Qila-Old Fort

Purana Qila-Old Fort

The ruins of this fort are located on a small hill once stood on the bank of the river Yamuna. 

Legend has it that the fort marked the site of Indraprastha, the magnificent capital of the Pandavas, though the construction was carried out by Sher Shah Suri any time between 1538 to 1545 A. D.

The structure houses a mosque, which has a double storey octagonal tower. It is said that the Mughal King Humayun fell from the tower and died. At the foot of the hill is the lake where there are arrangements for boating and a Sound and Light Show, which is held every evening in both Hindi and English.

 

 

 

Qutub Minar  

Qutub Minar

The buildings in this complex, 15km south of Delhi, date from the onset of Muslim rule in India. The Qutab Minar itself is a soaring tower of victory which was started in 1193, immediately after the defeat of the last Hindu king in Delhi. 

It is nearly 73 meters high and tapers from a 15-metre-diameter base to just 2.5 metres at the top. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony.

The first three storeys are made of red sandstone, the fourth and fifth of marble. Although Qutab-ud-din began construction of the tower, he only got to the first storey. His successors completed it, and in 1368, Feroz Shah Tughlaq rebuilt the top storeys and added a cupola. An earthquake brought the cupola down in 1803 and an Englishman replaced it with another in 1829. However, that dome was removed some years later. 

Today, this impressively ornate tower has a slight tilt, but otherwise has worn the centuries remarkably well. The tower is closed to visitors. A very interesting belief is assigned to this pillar- Stand with your back to the pillar and if you can hold your hands around it, then make a wish and it will surely come true. Try it!

 

 

 

Raj Ghat

Raj Ghat

Raj Ghat not far from the banks of the Yamuna River, has a simple black marble memorial to Mahatma Gandhi marking the spot where he was cremated following his assassination in 1948. 

A commemorative ceremony takes place every Friday. Two museums dedicated to Gandhi are nearby.

Jawaharlal Nehru was cremated just to the north at Shanti Vana (Forest of Peace). The area is now a beautiful park with labelled trees planted by a mixed bag of notables, including Elizabeth II, Dwight Eisenhower and Ho Chi Minh. The rarely-visited but quite beautiful Zinat-ul Masjid (Most Beautiful of Mosques) towers over Raj Ghat.

 

 

 

Rashtrapati Bhawan

Rashtrapati Bhawan

Is the official residence of the President of India stands at the opposite end of the Rajpath from India Gate. Completed in 1929, the palace like building is a blend of Mughal and Western architectural styles. 

It has its famous Mughal Gardens in it. If you are fortunate enough, you will get a golden opportunity to view it in mid-February to mid- March

 

 

 

Red Fort

Red Fort

The red sandstone walls of Lal Qila, the Red Fort, extend for two km and vary in height from 18 metres on the river side to 33 metres on the city side. 

Shah Jahan started construction of the massive fort in 1638 and it was completed in 1648. The Red Fort dates from the very peak of Mughal power.

Enclosed in this glorious Fort is Diwan-i-am, the hall meant for public audiences; Diwan-i-Khas, where private audiences were granted; Rang Mahal, the water cooled apartment of the royal ladies; the Pearl Mosque, a lovely, ornate dream in white marble. 

The Prime Minister of India addresses the nation from this age old Fort, on India’s Independence Day.

 

 

 

Safdar Jung Tomb 

Safdar Jung Tomb 

This marble domed mousoleum was the last famous Mughal monument built in Delhi in 1753-54, by the son of the second Nawab of Oudh. It is a son's tribute to his father, the Wazir of Mughal Emperor Muhammad Shah.

 

 

 

 

 

Shahjahanabad

Shahjahanabad

The most splendid of Delhi's old cities, built by Emperor Shah Jehan, is now a part of old Delhi. It was surrounded by a wall 8.8 km in circumference with 14 massive gates; Five of these still stand: Delhi Gate, Kashmere Gate, Turkman Gate, Ajmeri Gate and Lahori Gate.

 

 

 

 

Spice Market

Spice Market

Khari Baoli, the street that runs from the Fatehpuri Mosque to the western edge of the old city, is Delhi''s bustling wholesale spice market. It’s well worth a wander simply to take in the sights and smells because things have changed little here for centuries. Huge sacks of herbs and spices are still brought to the wholesalers on long, narrow barrows pushed by labourers, and there are eye-catching displays of everything from lentils and rice to giant jars of chutneys, pickles, nuts and tea.

 

 

 

Sports Stadium

Sports Stadium

Built for the IX Asiad held in 1982, the best known are Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium with a seating capacity of 75,000, Indira Gandhi Indoor Stadium (capacity 25,000), Yamuna Velodrome (capacity 2,250), Talkatora Indoor Stadium (capacity 5000), Chattarsal Stadium (capacity 10000) and Tughlaqabad Shooting Range for the shooters.

 

 

 

 

Tughlaqabad

Tughlaqabad

The walled city and fort of Tughlaqabad with its 13 gateways lies east of the Qutab Minar. The third city of Delhi, it was built by Ghiyas-ud-din Tughlaq. Its construction involved a legendary quarrel with the saint Nizamuddin, when the Tughlaq ruler took away the workers the latter wanted for work on his shrine.

 

 

 

 

Vigyan Bhawan

Vigyan Bhawan

Has hosted some of the most important international events and summits. There is the sense of history, intermingled with pride as you go past Parliament House, the curiosity as you glance at North and South Blocks—the decision-making, bureaucratic heart of India.

 

 

 

 

Appu ghar- Mini Disneyland

Appu ghar- Mini Disneyland

Appu Ghar in New Delhi is a crowd puller for the residents of the capital as well as those of neighbouring towns. Children will have a time of their life over here, while the enjoying the various rides. It has 22 rides for various age groups.

The Swinging Sensations

Appu Ghar has the usual fare of exciting games like Roller Coaster, the Big Splash, Dodgem Cars, the Eerie Tunnel, Giant Wheel, Columbus Jhoola - a ship high up in the sky, the Speeding Cup, a Cable Car, a Saucer that works on centrifugal force and lots more.

 

Ice Games

Appu Ghar has now introduced Ice Games at OYSTERS, where four acres of the Water Park have been blanketed with ice for winter sports. These include sledding, skiing, ice boating, where one can row through a river full of icebergs and bowling on ice.

Amusements for the grown ups are also available over here such as Rain Dance, Ice Dance all to the tune of fast music and according to the seasons in Delhi. This water park is the best place to cool down the sultry summer heat.

 

Address:
Gate no 9, Pragati Maidan, Tel no: 23371404/ 681/ 668/ 446 website: appughar.com Timings: noon- 8 pm. Entry fees and ride charges: Rs. 50- 300 upwards.

 

 

 

Fun'n Food Village

Fun'n Food Village

It has 21 amusement rides, no less, and each one of them is guaranteed to give you a serious adrenalin rush. The resort, south of the International airport, also has a water park, with features like a wave pool, a rivulet, an aqua chute and a typhoon tunnel.

At the snow zone here, you can try out your skills at skating, snow dance and ice hockey.

Address: Old Delhi- Gurgaon Road, Kapashera. Tel: 25064500- 03. Timings: 9,30am- 6pm. Entry fee and ride charges: Rs 250- 325 upward.

WET’ N WILD RESORT Is a multi-purpose resort. It offers water rides and a bowling alley, where kids can spend fun- filled hours.

Address: NH 8,Jaipur highway- Village Naurangpur- Gurgaon. Tel: 95124-2372931. Timings: 10am- 8pm. Entry fee and ride charges: Rs 150- 200 upwards.

In addition to the above sight seeing spots, Delhi is blessed with numerous spectacular parks and a variety of beautiful gardens. Very few can argue that Bangalore still deserves the title of India’s Garden City. That honour now belongs to the capital.

 

 

 

Deer Park

Deer Park

Next to the DLTA in South Delhi, landscaped with shady trees and lush grasses, and with the medieval- era Haus Khas tank to one end, Deer Park is a favoured spot for natured walks. 

Big attraction here is the spotted deer, peacocks, rabbits, guinea pigs and nilgai within the spotted deer enclosure, next to Park Baluchi Restaurant within the park. 

Thanks to the tank, a rich variety of birds can always spotted here. This is very popular with picnickers, joggers and fitness enthusiasts. A lovely rose garden, opposite IIT is a haven for yoga practitioners.

 

 

 

The Mughal Gardens

The Mughal Gardens

Sprawling across nearly 6 hectares of land, The Mughal Garden is located in the very heart of Delhi but remains out of sight. 

This is because it is situated in the very premises of the President house or Rashtrapati Bhavan. The Mughal Garden is not opened to public viewing normally.

It is only during the spring seasons that usually on sets in the month of February and March, that the gates of this majestic garden is opened for the common people.

The garden boasts of some of the most exotic and rare flowers and plants. The dwarf orange trees and numerous Rose plants are special attraction in the garden. The variety of flowers found here include Roses, Viscera, Jasmine, Sweet William, Oxalis, China Roses, Marigold and Bougainvillea and several other annuals and perennials. 

It has more than 250 rose varieties at one place and 60 kinds of Bougainvillea. Lutyens stressed on Indian variety to suit the climate and thus it has the best and largest collection of Indian Marigold flowers with 13 different varieties, Dahlias of all colors such as shades of pink, mauve, golden rust, red, white, yellow and even red and white striped dahlias.

 

 

 

Buddha Garden or the Buddha Jayanti Park

Buddha Garden or the Buddha Jayanti Park

Is one of the numerous newly laid gardens of Delhi. This sprawling lush green garden has been beautifully decorated with manicured lawns, streams, sloping terrain and mammoth trees. 

The Buddha garden is relatively new and has a sense of freshness in every corner. Buddha Jayanti Park was laid to commemorate the 2500th anniversary of Lord Buddha Nirvana.

 

 

 

The Garden of Five Senses

The Garden of Five Senses

Is the brainchild of the Delhi Development Authority. Established in the year 2003, this garden serves all possible senses of human being i.e. you can see, hear, smell, touch and taste the nature around you. 

The garden is spread out in 20-acre and is slowly turning to be a hub of cultural activities.

The garden of five senses has various facets serving the different senses of people, chief among those are Khas Bagh, Neel Bagh, Color Gardens, Food and shopping court, the Courts of Specimen Plants and amazing sculptures.

Further attractions are the Color Gardens and the Courts of Specimen Plants. The Color garden is a magnificent collection and combination of ordinary flowering shrubs and ground covers. Where as Courts of Specimen Plants has a display of rare species of plants and herbs. In the end don't miss the twenty-five different sculptures and murals by the popular craftsmen.

 

 

 

Boat Club 

Iis arguably the most popular outing and picnic destinations in Delhi. Situated around India Gate, Boat club is arguably the Boat club boasts of beautifully laid gardens and water bodies. 

A canal runs parallel to the Raj Path and has boating facility for families on nominal price. This is very popular among the youngsters. The atmosphere is usually pleasant in evening.

In the evening people come here for walk and children can be seen playing on the beautiful green lawns and around the trees that surround the structure. You will also find many fountains surrounding the structure. The fountains too are illuminated by colors representing the Indian Tricolor.

 

 

 

Shalimar Garden 

It is one of the most important Moghul gardens in the city. The Shalimar Garden, which lies in the suburbs of the city, was once the first-night staging post for the Moghuls on their way to Kashmir and Lahore. In 1658, Aurangzeb was crowned emperor here. 

Tickets: Available at the site and Delhi Tourism office

 

 

 

National Zoological Park

National Zoological Park

The Delhi zoo, close to Purana Qila, near ITO, was established in 1959 and is spread over a massive area of 214 acres. Is regarded as one of the finest zoos in Asia and efforts have been made to provide an almost natural habitat to the animals and birds. 

There are more than 2,000 animals and bird species from places like Africa, America, Australia and even Asia.

There is a lot of greenery around the zoo and it is an ideal picnic spot especially in winter. Timings summer 0800 to 1800 hours, winter 0900 to 1700 hours. Closed on Friday.

 

 

 

Nehru Park

Nehru Park

The picturesque 85-acre Nehru Park garden, located opposite Ashoka Hotel in Chanakyapuri, is filled with grassy mounds, ponds, groves and flowering trees has a swimming pool and snack bar too.

 

 

 

 

Talkatora Gardens

Built in a bowl (Tal-Katora) shape; Talkatora garden is situated on the Wellington crescent. With mini-lakes and fountains, as well as the swimming pool and the modern stadium, it attracts people round the year. ]

 

 

 

Delhi Ridge

The northern extension of the Aravalli hill range, Delhi Ridge is an ideal place for bird watchers and nature lovers. Visiting the ridge you can view nature's astonishing beauty and enjoy its serenity.

 

 

 

Lahore Gate

The main gate to the fort takes its name from the fact that it faces towards Lahore, now in Pakistan. If one spot could be said to be the emotional and symbolic heart of the modern Indian nation, the Lahore Gate of the Red Fort is probably it. After independence, many important political speeches were given by Nehru and Indira Gandhi to crowds amassed on the maidan outside and on Independence Day each year, the Prime Minister addresses a huge crowd.

 

 

 

Some other notable picturesque parks and gardens include:

NATIONAL ROSE GARDEN in Chanakyapuri, MANSAROVAR GARDEN in Noida, ASTHA KUNJ, ROSHANARA GARDEN in North Delhi, near Northern Ridge, INDRAPRASHT, MAHATMA GANDHI PARK and NETAJI SUBHASH PARK.

The Parks and Gardens in Delhi are major places of interest. The Parks and Gardens in Delhi emit an aura of peace. Indiaprofile.com offers complete information on Parks and Gardens in Delhi and other Tourist Attractions in Delhi.